Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Microsoft Announces Major Change for Windows 7 Monthly Updates

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,706
    Satfix Buxs
    24,179
    Thanks
    1,533
    Thanked 5,445x in 1,400 Posts
    Items Mexico
Gift received at 03-28-2014, 12:29 AM from hedley
Message: Mejico LindoCrown Royal
Gift received at 06-19-2013, 10:30 PM from darlinkat
Message: Enjoy !!! lolRadio
Gift received at 12-15-2012, 03:10 PM from ICEMAN
Message: merry chritmas

    Default Microsoft Announces Major Change for Windows 7 Monthly Updates

    Microsoft Announces Major Change for Windows 7 Monthly Updates
    Microsoft has announced a new change for the way Windows 7 devices receive monthly updates, as the company pulls the PciClearStaleCache.exe component from the rollups.

    The April 2019 monthly rollup for Windows 7 no longer includes this tool, and Microsoft says that beginning with this release, no other update would ship with it built-in.

    Instead, what Windows 7 users and system admins need to do is install the updates released between April 2018 and March 2019, which included the aforementioned components as part of every update cycle.

    The April 2019 monthly rollup for Windows 7 (and the first one that ships without PciClearStaleCache.exe) is KB4493472.

    “Administrators should ensure that any one or more of the Monthly rollups released between April 10, 2018 (KB 4093118) and March 12, 2019 (KB 4489878) have been installed prior to installing April 2019 and later updates. Each of these rollup updates includes PciClearStaleCache.exe,” Microsoft explains.Windows 7 to reach EOL in January 2020As for the purpose of this tool and the reasons it’s bundled into monthly rollups, Microsoft says it helps resolve inconsistencies in the internal PCI cache.

    This means that if the static IP address settings are lost, the Wi-Fi network adapters are disabled, and the Wi-Fi profile settings are not displayed in the network flyout, there’s a chance you need to install an update that includes PciClearStaleCache.exe.

    Windows 7, which continues to be the second most-used Windows version on the market, is projected to be retired in January 2020, and users are recommended to begin planning the upgrade to Windows 10 as soon as possible.

    Also worth knowing for Windows 7 users is that this month’s rollup causes issues with certain antivirus software including Sophos Avira & Avast Microsoft has blocked the update from being offered to these devices until fixes are issued to resolve the bug on Windows 7 and 8.1. Avast has already published patches

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Angel Eyes For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    14
    Satfix Buxs
    88
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi Friend:
    I am a Windows 7 user, and I got the information from Microsoft about "shutting up shop" on Windows 7 from January 20, 2020.
    I am wondering aloud!. What happens if your computer after January 20, 2020 with Windows 7 suffers a major crash, or something, and you have to wipe the hard drive clean, and do a clean install, would you get back automatically all the updates to January 20, 2020?
    Can all Microsoft updates be saved and stored separately in a folder in the event that after January 20, 2020, this is not possible.
    Advise

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Seeing Beyond
    Posts
    320
    Satfix Buxs
    2,674
    Thanks
    822
    Thanked 556x in 171 Posts

    Default

    A few links that maybe helpful. All kinda MS updates in the first one. Second one has some iso images of various OS. The 7 AIO has SP1 included along with other versions...

    Code:
    http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/home.aspx
    Code:
    https://softlay.net/operating-system/windows-7-all-in-one-iso-free-download-32-64-bit.html
    Man looks in the abyss, there's nothing staring back at him. At that moment,
    man finds his character. And that is what keeps him out of the abyss.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to foresight For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    14
    Satfix Buxs
    88
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Thanks for your help, foresight.
    The Microsoft Update Catalog is exactly what I was thinking of. I have since downloaded it and file on my flashdrive with other downloads and drivers.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    73
    Satfix Buxs
    401
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 25x in 19 Posts

    Default

    As was the case of Windows XP the dedicated users of it were basically forced to upgrade to 7.
    Internet connectivity (browser usage and many applications requiring Internet access) simply was phased out.
    Java, Flash, Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome simply quit working. Update prompts to a newer version only to see that it was not supported under XP anymore. Industry stuck with XP as long as it could due to incompatibility of hardware and peripherals which there were no 7 drivers or support for. You could read that as planned obsolescence.

    Like me some of the peripheral cards in my pc that worked fine under XP quit with no driver support under 7.
    There were round about ways to a fix. Basically older hardware was phased out.

    There is nothing to prevent you from formatting your pc, installing a new hard drive, installing XP in your old pc.
    You could search for and download a cumulative updates package. And there are apps to let you backup all of your updates.
    You could use Acronis True Image to create a clone of your pc or a restore image. Then store it safely away.
    But once again. If a browser update is mandatory. And XP (7) is not supported anymore. You're basically SOL.

    I'm using an old Dell P4 3.0 GHz pc in my garage running MX linux. It wont run XP (since I require browser access). It chokes and video drivers are generic, Dell drivers wont install under 7. But as a repurposed pc running Linux, it's pretty OK.

    When the initial free upgrade to Windows 10 came out. It was a disaster. I made a lot of money repairing, salvaging files, etc for those that expected the upgrade to be smooth. Which it wasn't. I did the same thing (but rolled....or had to reinstall....7)
    After a year or so all of the guinea pig testers who got duped into the free upgrade, the bugs were largely worked out.
    So I'm running 10 Home on my pc I built for 7 Ultimate. It's not bad.

    Reality sets in when you look at the Windows NT 4,95, 98, etc pc's that may still work but are totally useless today because their time has come and gone.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •